No sovereign debt crisis here in the U.S., but we’ve got other problems, namely jobs.

The United States may not be experiencing a sovereign debt crisis like Europe, which I have written about quite often recently, but we have our own problems. In Europe, 20 percent unemployment is making it very difficult to balance budgets. While unemployment is not as bad here, we are experiencing the worst economic recovery since the Great Depression. And today’s ADP report proves it:

Private employers unexpectedly cut 39,000 jobs in September after an upwardly revised gain of 10,000 in August, a report by a payrolls processor showed on Wednesday.

The August figure was originally reported as a loss of 10,000.

The median of estimates from 38 economists surveyed by Reuters for the ADP Employer Services report, jointly developed with Macroeconomic Advisers LLC, was for a rise of 24,000 private-sector jobs in September.

Employment fell 63,000 short of expectations, though last month was revised up by 20,000. ADP only measures private employment. The government report due out Friday also includes public sector jobs, which is expected to decline as census workers were recently laid off after the census was completed.

The ADP figures come ahead of the government’s much more comprehensive labor market report on Friday, which includes both public and private sector employment.

That report is expected to show overall nonfarm payrolls were unchanged in September, based on a Reuters poll of analysts, but a rise in private payrolls of 75,000.

Woh! These economists expect 75,000 private sector jobs were created last month when ADP said 39,000 were lost? Seems like somebody is way off the mark here.

On a side note, these numbers are bad news for Democrats. This is the last employment report before the November election. Regardless whether Friday’s report shows a small gain or small loss of jobs, the bottom line is that this has been a “recoveryless recovery” in terms of employment. The following chart by calculatedriskblog.com clearly show that this recession was not only deeper than all others since WWII but also that the recovery has been virtually non-existent.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s