Portugal ready for its bailout?

In a follow-up to yesterday’s “Ready for round three of the sovereign debt crisis?Marketwatch is covering the Portugal story. Here’s the lead:

Portugal remained in the spotlight Monday as Lisbon fought intensifying speculation that it would be forced to become the third euro-zone nation to seek a fiscal bailout due to rising borrowing costs.

News reports over the weekend and on Monday said the Portuguese government was under pressure from European Union partners to tap the rescue fund established by the EU and the International Monetary Fund in hopes such a move would quell the ongoing turmoil in European sovereign-debt markets.

Portugal has continued to insist that it won’t need aid but a key test looms on Wednesday when the government attempts to sell between 750 million and 1.25 billion euros ($936 million and $1.6 billion) of three- and nine-year bonds.

Now the part I find most relevant:

The yield on 10-year Portuguese government bonds pressed above the 7% threshold on Friday to trade around 7.14% and likely would have jumped even higher had the European Central Bank not been an apparent buyer of Portuguese bonds, analysts said.

It took Greece 16 days and Ireland 20 days to request EU/IMF aid after their 10-year yields breached the 7% level, said Gary Jenkins, head of fixed income at Evolution Securities. He noted that Portugal has been through the 7% barrier previously and then saw yields retract somewhat.

The cost of insuring Portuguese government debt against default via credit default swaps continued to rise Monday, with the spread of five-year swaps widening by 12 basis points to a record 555 basis points, according to data provider Markit.

A bailout of Portugal could be imminent. But Portugal is a small country and not likely to have any major impact. However, this will only further push Spain and Italy toward bailouts.

And let’s not forget Belgium either:

King Albert II of Belgium on Monday called on the country’s caretaker government to write a new budget in an effort to calm worries the nation will be unable to meet its budget goals, The Wall Street Journal reported. The nation has been left without a formal government since a June election due to disagreements between politicians from the Dutch-speaking north and the French-speaking south. The yield premium demanded by investors to hold 10-year Belgian debt widened by 12 basis points to around 138 basis points, or 1.38 percentage points, the report said, near record levels seen in November. The king asked current Prime Minister Yves Leterme to draft a 2011 budget with a deficit below the 4.1% of gross domestic product agreed with the European Commission last year, the report said.

Europe is a total mess, not that the US is much better. So far, everything that has been done has been stop-gap. Countries with 12 percent deficits propose reducing them to 5 percent. Countries with debt of more than 100 percent of GDP have no plan to reduce them. These countries are only proposing to reduce the rate of decline, but not stop it nor turn things around. Until I see countries with plans to reduce the size of government and balance their budgets, I will continue to worry and write about the sovereign debt crisis and the economic doom it will cause if not addressed.

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