Sovereign debt crisis hits record levels. Preview of United States?

A quick look at the charts shows the sovereign debt crisis has hit record levels along with European interest rates:

Greece 10-year yield:

Ireland 10-year yield:

Portugal 10-year yield:

With 10-year interest rates up at 14.9, 10.5, and 9.5 percent (and two-year rates even higher in many cases), it is hard to see how these countries can afford to pay these rates. If the United States were paying a 10% interest rate with debt about 90 percent of GDP, 9 percent of GDP and about a third of federal spending would go just to paying interest on the debt. In Greece, where debt is about 130 percent of GDP, the government is spending about 19.4 percent of GDP on interest. This is clearly unsustainable, which is why everybody expects these countries to “restructure” their debts, a euphemism for defaulting and paying back less than they owe. This expectation is a self-fulfilling prophecy because it pushes rates even higher.

With the situation in the United States only marginally better, how long before rates rise here and the U.S. defaults? Best to cut spending now, when we have a choice, than later when interest rates rise and the government has to divert spending to interest payments.

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2 responses to “Sovereign debt crisis hits record levels. Preview of United States?

  1. People, it seems, are refusing to believe that Americas credit card card is all but maxed-out. It’s irrational but true. I’m afraid they won’t accept the truth until the credit card is declared invalid.

    • That’s exactly what happened in Greece, Portugal, and Ireland. They didn’t cut back until it was too late. We could learn from their example, but I’ve seen no signs of that from our current government.

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