Tag Archives: Basis point

EU falling apart as Ireland refuses its money and Austria refuses to help Greece.

Marketwatch reports:

Irish officials resisted intensifying calls for the nation to accept a bailout as euro-zone finance ministers prepared to meet Tuesday, insisting the government is capable of fulfilling its debt obligations until the middle of next year.

But that misses the point, economists said. The debate centers on worries about the state of the nation’s troubled banks rather than Dublin’s sovereign-debt obligations for the near term.

European officials are reportedly cranking up pressure on Ireland to accept a bailout in an effort to keep Dublin’s fiscal woes from driving up borrowing costs in Spain, Portugal and other so-called peripheral countries in the euro zone.

Meanwhile, the cost of insuring Irish debt against default rose after declining from record levels Friday and Monday. The spread on five-year Irish credit default swaps widened to 515 basis points Tuesday morning from 497 points on Monday, according to data provider Markit.

The Portuguese CDS spread widened 12 basis points to 425, while the Spanish CDS spread widened to 255 basis points from 250 and the Greek spread widened to 900 basis points from 853.

The EU is basically begging Ireland to take its money. Ireland says it doesn’t need it, at least not now. But the EU is not really trying to help Ireland here. It is trying to show the world that it stands behind the EU nations. The EU is trying to help Spain, Portugal, and Greece by lending to Ireland. But why should Ireland hurt its reputation for those countries?

This “selfishness” is spreading across Europe:

According to Dow Jones (via ForexLive) Austria has decided to withhold its contribution to the Greek bailout, citing failure to make progress on finances.

This is obviously a pretty big problem, since that will spur others to wonder why they’re still contributing to the bailout fund.

So, debtors are refusing to borrow from the EU and creditors are refusing to support the debtors. The European Union is not looking very unified right now.

Anybody who studied basic economics learned that cartels cannot survive forever. From wikipedia:

Game theory suggests that cartels are inherently unstable, as the behaviour of members of a cartel is an example of a prisoner’s dilemma. Each member of a cartel would be able to make more profit by breaking the agreement (producing a greater quantity or selling at a lower price than that agreed) than it could make by abiding by it. However, if all members break the agreement, all will be worse off.

The incentive to cheat explains why cartels are generally difficult to sustain in the long run. Empirical studies of 20th century cartels have determined that the mean duration of discovered cartels is from 5 to 8 years. However, one private cartel operated peacefully for 134 years before disbanding.[7] There is a danger that once a cartel is broken, the incentives to form the cartel return and the cartel may be re-formed.

We are now seeing the EU cartel fall apart. While it is unlikely the EU will disappear entirely, it appears to losing power as individual countries restore their economic sovereignty.

Sovereign debt spreads hit records. MSM still unavailable for comment.

Marketwatch reports:

Portugal, Ireland, Spain CDS spreads hit records

Fears surrounding sovereign-debt problems on the periphery of the euro zone drove the cost of protecting the debt of Ireland, Portugal and Spain to record highs on Thursday, according to data provider Markit. The spread on five-year Portuguese credit-default swaps widened to 505 basis points from around 491 on Wednesday, topping the 500-level for the first time, Markit reported. That means it would now cost $505,000 a year to insure $10 million of Irish sovereign debt against default for five years. The five-year Irish CDS spread widened 27 basis points to 620, while Spain’s spread widened to 294 basis points from 279. Greece’s spread was 12 basis points wider at 890.

I am in total shock and disbelief. No, not that these countries are headed down the drain. I’ve been warning about that for a while. I am shocked that this isn’t on the front page of every newspaper and the lead story on the TV and radio news shows. The world is burning while the main stream media fiddles.

Irish bond premiums higher than Greece’s before its bailout. Sovereign debt crisis continues.

Lost in all the news of the election and quantitative easing, the sovereign debt crisis is getting worse. Marketwatch reports:

Investors are dumping bonds in Ireland and Greece in a reprise of the sovereign debt crisis that shook global markets six months ago, as political infighting threatens to stymie budget reforms in the most debt-strapped countries.

On Tuesday, Irish credit costs surged to a record high and bond prices tumbled, after the reported resignation of Jim McDaid, a member of parliament for Ireland’s Fianna Fail party, added to worries the government would fail to muster the votes for planned spending cuts and tax hikes totalling 15 billion euros ($21 billion.)

Credit-default spreads for Irish sovereign debt jumped 22 basis points to 5.20 percentage points, and hit 5.30 percentage points, a record high, said Markit. The gain means it costs about $520,000 a year to buy five years of default insurance for $10 million in Irish government debt.

The surge in Irish credit fears was echoed in higher costs to buy protection on debt of other so-called “PIIGS” countries. Greek CDS widened 15 basis points to 8.45 percentage points, while Portuguese CDS gained 8 basis points to 4.02 percentage points. One basis point is 1/100 of a percentage point.

Ireland’s 10-year bonds tumbled, sending yields up 19 basis points to 7.17% and further widening the gap with benchmark German bonds, which yielded 2.47%.

Yields on 10-year Greek government bonds surged 10 basis points to 10.67%. Selloffs in Greek and Portuguese debt were in full force last week when their governments’ own budget initiatives came into doubt.

Bloomberg takes a more dismal outlook of the situation:

Irish Finance Minister Brian Lenihan may have just one month to stave off an international bailout.

The extra yield that investors demand to hold Irish 10-year bonds over German bunds surged to a record today as Lenihan tries to put together a 2011 budget by Dec. 7 that convinces investors he can get the country’s finances in order.

The premium on Irish bonds has doubled since August and is now wider than the spread on Greek debt four days before it sought a European Union-led bailout in April. That’s putting pressure on Lenihan to cut the deficit and overcome both an economic slump and the rising cost of bailing out the country’s banks.

This is huge, but nobody is talking about it. “The premium on Irish bonds has doubled since August and is now wider than the spread on Greek debt four days before it sought a European Union-led bailout in April.” Ireland can fall apart at any minute but the market and media is totally ignoring it. Forewarned is forearmed.